1.4 Management Decision Records Guidance

RELATED CHAPTERS

Supervision Guidance

Case Recording

AMENDMENT

This chapter was updated in August 2016.


Contents

  1. Management Decision Records
  2. MDR’s Completed as Part of Formal Supervision to be Clearly Entitled ‘Supervision’
  3. Content for a MDR
  4. MDR’s at Point of Case Transfer
  5. Content: Family Placements


1. Management Decision Records

A Management Decision Record (MDR) is an important part of our work with a child. It enables Managers to clearly record:

  • The decisions they have made or have been made in conjunction with a more senior manager;
  • The facts and reflection on the child’s circumstances that have led to this decision being made;
  • Any risks for this child and provide an analysis of this;
  • The actions required, and who will complete those actions;
  • The timeframe within which the actions will be completed;
  • The child’s voice of their lived experience.

These can be used as headings within the MDR.

In most circumstances an MDR will be completed as an outcome of a supervision session (see Supervision Guidance).


2. MDR’s Completed as Part of Formal Supervision to be Clearly Entitled ‘Supervision’

In circumstances where new information or a significant change in the circumstances for a child substantially alters our care plan for a child or carer, an MDR is required to record this change, the decisions made and the reasons for this. Examples include:

  • New Section 47 enquiries;
  • An escalation of risks or changing circumstances that require a change in the Child In Need Plan / Child Protection Plan;
  • Decision to proceed to Public Law Outline panel;
  • Change of placement;
  • Decision to instigate proceedings;
  • Allegations and referrals to the Local Authority Designated Officer (LADO);
  • Placement disruptions;
  • Voice and views of child and how they have shaped our plans.

This is not an exhaustive list.

Every MDR needs to reflect the child’s journey.

These MDR’s will fall outside the regular supervision frequency and are critical in ensuring that the life changing decisions we make in respect of any child are clearly evidenced and recorded in a timely fashion.


3. Content for a MDR

The first MDR completed by the Team Manager will need to reflect:

  • The family composition;
  • The background to the case;
  • The current situation;
  • The risk assessment; and
  • Any actions agreed with timescales.

Subsequent MDR’s should not simply repeat all the information contained in the first or earlier MDR but seek to move the child’s journey forward.

MDR’s raised as part of routine supervision and decision making should cover the following issues:

  • What has changed since the last supervision session;
  • What needs to change for the child;
  • What are the views of the child;
  • Analysis - risks, protective factors and unknowns and any emerging risks that need to be considered;
  • Review of previous actions and tasks agreed;
  • Decisions, actions and timescales;
  • if a previously agreed action is no longer required and why;
  • What is the impact of the work being completed on the child;
  • Reflect on the child’s lived experience and what it is like for the child to live in this household.

These can be used as headings within the MDR.

An urgent MDR raised outside the routine of supervision should seek to record:

  • What the significant change or information is;
  • How this is likely to impact on the child;
  • What the views of the child are;
  • Analysis of risk and consideration of any possible alternatives to mitigate the risk;
  • Decisions, actions and timescales.

Information contained within the urgent MDR(s) should be reflected in the next supervision session and will therefore be reflected in subsequent MDR’s as part of recording what has changed since the last time.


4. MDR’s at Point of Case Transfer

An MDR must be completed when the case file transfers between Teams or to a new worker in the same team. In these circumstances the MDR should serve as a summary of the child’s circumstances, analysis of current risk, interventions etc and provide the receiving Manager or worker with a clear, summarised starting point of all the relevant information. MDR’s should include:

  • The family composition;
  • The background to the case;
  • Review of previous actions and tasks agreed;
  • The current situation;
  • Analysis - risks, protective factors and unknowns;
  • Decisions, ongoing actions and timescales – clearly identify who is responsible for doing what;
  • The voice and views of the child and how they have been used to shape our plans.

These can be used as headings within the MDR.


5. Content: Family Placements

MDR’s raised by Team Managers in Family Placements should cover the following issues:

  • What has changed since the last time we spoke - changes in approval status, including variations;
  • Impact of new placements;
  • Arrivals and departures in the household;
  • Any requests from carers for respite;
  • Significant financial requests;
  • Changes of care plan for the child in placement;
  • Any other significant changes in circumstances for the carer;
  • Impact on child/children in placement of and changes;
  • The voice and views of the child.

These can be used as headings within the MDR.

Any incidents, allegations, complaints and concerns must continue to be discussed and followed up at every subsequent session until the matter reaches resolution.

An urgent MDR raised outside the routine of supervision should seek to record:

  • What the significant change or information is;
  • How this is likely to impact on the child or children in placement;
  • An analysis of risk and consideration of any possible alternatives to mitigate the risk;
  • Decisions, actions and timescales.

These can be used as headings within the MDR.

End